Church of the Resurrection

 

Resurrection

 

Because of the growth in population for a number of years in Mallow parish it was decided early in 1960, at a meeting of priests and parishioners, to enlarge and repair St. Mary’s Church. There is no record at this meeting of building a second church notwithstanding that Mrs. Kate O’Leary of Sandfield House, had, a few months earlier, donated a two acre field to be used when needed as a site for a church in the southern part of the town. A Church Fund Committee was established under the chairmanship of Fr. John Sheehan, C.C. and an intensive fund-raising campaign got underway.

Five years later the fund had reached the sum of £70,000 (€88,882). At a meeting held on the 19th January 1965 chaired by Monsignor James W. Sheedy (P.P. Mallow 1945 - 1967), it was decided that as the town was expanding more rapidly on the south side of the river, the parish would be best served by building a second church. On receiving Episcopal approval, Chevalier J.R. Boyd Barrett, Architect, 5 Camden Place, Cork, was commissioned to draw plans for a church to accommodate a congregation of about 1,000.

The tender of Messrs. Daniel Hegarty & Sons was accepted on the recommendation of the architect and the contract for £108,330 was signed. On the 8th September 1965 at Ballydaheen the site that had been donated Mrs. Kate O’Leary was blessed and the first sod was cut. One year later the foundation stone with the following inscription was laid:

FOUNDATION STONE OF

THE CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTION OF OUR LORD

WAS BLESSED AND LAID BY

MOST REV. JOHN J. AHERN BISHOP OF CLOYNE

ON 21st SEPTEMBER 1966

ASSISTED BY RT. REV. MGR. J. W. SHEEDY, P.P., V.G.

On the 11th December, 1968, the church on completion was blessed by Bishop John J. Ahern. Monsignor James W. Sheedy died before the church was completed and was succeeded by Monsignor Richard J. Roynane as P.P.

Description of Church

The church is fan shaped in plan with the altar at the apex, varying in width from 35 ft. to 108ft. at the back. The over all length is 160 ft. and the height of the entrance tower is 85 ft. In profile it is half fan shaped as the roof ridge increases in height from the sanctuary end to where it abuts the tower. It is an extremely well designed church with a clear view of the altar from all vantage points as the floor level of the sanctuary is 3ft above the floor of the church and there are no internal support pillars.

The entrance tower is built in stone and cut limestone and the side walls are predominantly in precast blocks and stone. The window mullions and transoms are in precast concrete. The copper roof is carried on steel trusses which were made and erected by Shannon Foundry, Ltd, Limerick.

There are twelve stained glass windows depicting scenes from the New Testament. The two flanking the sanctuary are larger than the rest. The one on the left depicts the Death of Christ and the one originally opposite it, depicting the Resurrection has been removed to the centre of the sanctuary where it is artificially lit and in its original place there is now a window depicting ------------------------------------.

These windows were made and erected by Murphy, Davitt Studios, Ltd., Dublin. The architecture reflects the post Vatican II church design that emerged in Ireland during the mid to late 1960s. While the church is dramatically different in style and atmosphere, to St. Mary’s, it is an impressive building that fulfils its main role as a place of worship and contemplation.